Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Another emotional post

Ok, this is the last one- I promise!  (I probably also lie, but as I mean that statement for reals right now, is it really lying? ;))

Today, I am narrowing in on getting The Glass Gargoyle out into the world. As in, it should be out trying to take over the galaxy by this time next week (fingers, toes, and eyes crossed). And I am such a little bundle of emotional mayhem it is amazing that I can even feed myself, let alone get dressed and go to work.

First, let me say that I am in AWE of all the people who have self-published a book.  Seriously, this isn't something for wimps. The fact that all of you have done it without your heads exploding--and for those I know personally--without letting the insanity show, is amazing!  I feel like I've been walking around with a "this woman is a total spaz" sign on me for the last month.

I'll admit it, I'm not good at hiding my emotions. Pretty bad poker player and awful liar for that very reason. So, as I'm going through all of the "OMG! My book is coming OUT!"  screams of terror, along with the "OMG! My book is coming OUT!" screams of joy--they are pretty much on my face, on this blog, on Facebook, Twitter, plastered on the side of my car, etc.

Going through this process is such an insane learning curve I can't even begin to tell you (and I'm a wordy writer, so that says something right there ;)).  And I know I have made and will make plenty of mistakes. But I think I've finally come to terms with the fact that it's okay to screw up.  Our society really likes to mock those who try and fail. Mistakes are held up for public scorn on social media and shared with others.

That's just wrong. If we're always afraid of screwing up, of not being perfect, we're never going to try anything.  Things that take a lot of work and a LOT of risk (like putting out your own book, movie, video, having an art showing, etc) just won't be done. Too much work, too much risk. And that's sad.

You have to be willing to make mistakes to move forward. Accept that things aren't going to be perfect.

My first book will be out soon.

I will have made mistakes.

And I am still so freaking happy it's going to meet you all, I can't even explain it.

Thank you for joining me on this ongoing journey- and don't be afraid in whatever you do!

14 comments:

  1. I smiled the whole time I read this. I know exactly what you mean. Just take a deep breath and take the plunge. Can't wait to see your book!

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    1. Thank you Lori! I really feel like I'm approaching the very top of an insanely high roller coaster...that click click click sound as the cars slowlllly inch towards the top and the amazing rush afterwards (also filled with terror ;)).

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  2. Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts – Winston Churchill

    You are my shining example of bravery, Marie. Keep calm and carry on. ;)

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    1. I LOVE LOVE LOVE that quote, Sharon! I need that on a sign over my desk...and maybe tattooed on my arm :).

      Thank you!

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  3. The reason I love your posts is that you share your emotions and your journey! It's nice to know someone else gets spazzy about this stuff. :) Good luck next week!

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    1. LOL! Thank you, Carla! Us spazzballs have to stick together! I almost get annoyed at folks who go through things and never let their inner turmoil show- then I feel worse for freaking! It's good to know there are more of us than them ;).

      Thanks!

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  4. Best wishes on the release of your book and that is a gorgeous cover!

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    1. Thank you on both counts, Veronica! :)

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    1. *fingers and toes crossed* SOON!!! :) Thanks, Loni!

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  6. Marie, I just got back from the Kyoto Symposium here at SDSU. Dr. Robert S. Langer, a BioEngineer, won the Advanced Technology award for his life long contributions in the field of drug delivery systems. Very inspiring man.

    Dr. Langer talked extensively about being a chemical engineer trying to do biological engineering when the field didn't exist yet. His grant application was turned down six times from 1981 to 1993. In 1996 he co-founded his own research company to research and develop the polymer for targeted delivery of drugs directly to the affected cells. His work has revolutionized treatments for all kinds of conditions from cancer to drug addiction.

    The take away for us writers comes from a question asked after his presentation. When asked by a member of the audience what advice he would give young people facing rejection he replied: (I am paraphrasing) First, realize that those rejecting your ideas are wrong. Second, listen to why they are rejecting your ideas. Third, figure out how to explain your ideas so they understand. If you are trying to get from San Diego to San Francisco and find the road closed, then look for another route. If that route closes, look for another. It may take longer than the first route would have, but turning back will not get you there at all.

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    1. This is wonderful, Cyndi, and very much speaks to this path I'm on. Thank you!

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  7. Hon, I am so stinkin' excited about your book coming out, I just can't stand it!! I can just imagine how you are feeling about it!!! I have to admit, you already have most of the self published books I have seen beaten hands down because you have such an awesome cover on this book AND the next one!!! Sigh, I feel like the gal in the commercial with her face pressed up to the storefront window saying "Open, open, open!!!"

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    1. Thank you, Deb! I wish we lived closer so we could squee in person, but I know you'll be doing it with me :). I really hope you love them!

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