Wednesday, June 2, 2021

#IWSG--process changes

 Hello and welcome to another turn through the writing world! The Insecure Writer's Support Group is a group of writers helping writers. Once a month we shout out into the void--join us!




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Today, I'm going to ramble a bit about writing processes and specifically, my process.

Every single writer has a slightly different process, that's why when we see a successful author post their process, we can't duplicate them exactly. They succeed because they found what worked for them, aka their personality, mindset, way of working, access to space, type of book they write, etc. Sometimes THEY can't even replicate what they did.

So, how do we deal with our own process, if duplicating those big guns doesn't work? Excellent question!

Follow them, see what they do. Also check out authors with hardcore writing platforms (if you have a kindle, just download a sample of anything look even remotely helpful--if you like the sample, then get the book ;)).  Make notes of what resonates with you. Steal the ideas and concepts that fit you and who you are.

But don't think any of them can give you a magic ticket to the one perfect process that will make you a six-figure author over night. (And if you find that- let's talk ;)).

Between the successful authors in your genre and those writing gurus, build something that fits you. There is no wrong way to write--nor is there really a right way.  I'm in a lot of FB writing groups and if you wanna see me come out swinging, have someone state an absolute for writing. Yes, extremes might be more problematic--if you hate punctuation, capital letters, vowels, etc it might be more difficult. But you can do it if it makes you happy. When folks get full of themselves and prescribe that you MUST or NEVER do things is when I start verbally punching people.

That being said, here's my process :).

I find it works better for me to have multiple projects and different stages. This year that also means varying lengths too as I ended up in six anthologies...all but one are this summer. Crazy!

I reread what I wrote the day before. This is to get me back in the headspace of that world as well as a first round "Oops" fix.

When one is done, I go through it again to make sure it makes sense (pantser here, so tangents can happen). Then it goes to my developmental editor and beta readers.  As they give it back, I do more clean ups. Once it's as good as I think I can make it at that point in time--I send it to my proofreader. Then to my formatter, and upload the ebook and print.

I couldn't say how many edits I go through, or the time between them as I am constantly going back to it, plus more editing when the other folks results come back.

This works for me. For now. If it stops working, or I feel a need to expand, I will. Process is fluid, if yours isn't working, change it up.

What is your process and how has it changed?

Happy IWSG day!


18 comments:

  1. The only absolute rule is there are no absolute rules. My own revision process loosely is write, rewrite, revise, let someone else read it, revise, read out loud, and maybe finally finish the damn thing. Deadlines always impact how long or short a period this is for me. Deadlines - I get shit done. No deadline? Bwahahaha!

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    1. I so hear you on the deadline/no deadline issue! If left without one, I have a tendency to muck around too much ;). Thank you for coming by and commenting!

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  2. It also drives me nuts when people put out absolute rules. I bet I did when I was first starting, though. At that point, "the rules" are everywhere. The more you write, the more you learn to break the rules.

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    1. Very true. I started writing pre-internet, and it was ALL rules back then!

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  3. Yes, each writer has a different process and there are no set boxes as such.

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    1. Exactly! But it's hard when these big guns make it sound as if you can just do what they did ;).

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  4. I believe that we learn a lot about writing by checking out another writer's process, however, we learn how they do it. We need to learn how to it our way. That's when a writer truly shines. :-)

    Anna from elements of emaginette

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    1. Yup- my own process is a hodgepodge of tons of other writers. I've figured out what currently works for me out bits and pieces of others.

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  5. I lose count of my edits or revisions. I just stop editing and revising when it looks like it's as perfect as I can get it as long as the story had went through critiques in my writers critique group. After I've taken the suggestions from those critiques into consideration and revised to where the story reads as smooth and convincing as possible then that's when I submit it.

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  6. What works for me has changed a few times. I'll find something and it works well, but then life usually butts in and takes over so I end up pausing. Then when I go back, I end up coming up with a new thing to try. Repeat process.

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  7. Hi, it took me a long time to figure out my writing process. We all need to do that, as everyone's process is different.

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  8. Congrats on making the cut in 6 anthologies! That's awesome!
    Yes, every writer has a unique journey and yours is definitely working well for you.
    Happy Writing!

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    1. Thank you! Sometimes it doesn't feel like it works, but gotta keep trying!

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  9. There's no absolute rules. Maybe not enough guidelines. It's just advice and you can choose to take it or not, but there's no point following a rule that's counteractive to your writing. Congrats on your anthologies - very impressive!

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    1. Yup! Take what works and dump the rest ;).

      Thank you!

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